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  • Air Quality Case Study Collection 2020 - read digital edition Publications
    Air Quality Case Study Collection 2020 - read digital edition

    air quality case study 2020 mainThe Environment Times' Air Quality Case Study Collection for 2020 is available to read as a digital 'flickread' version, and with the option to download it as a pdf file too.

     

    See the stories from those tackling the air quality health and environmental problem.

     

    Either click on the following link or front cover image to access the publication  https://flickread.com/edition/html/5e787d30aafab#1

  • Futurebuild 2020 Trade Shows & Conferences
    Futurebuild 2020

    The built environment industry can influence the resilience, sustainability and quality of homes, buildings and elements of infrastructure and cities. Registration has opened for Futurebuild 2020 with a call to industry to act now if we are to successfully tackle the challenges facing us all. By joining the event from 03 to 05 March at ExCeL London, visitors will be able to unite with industry innovators to tackle climate change and become the catalyst for change that's so greatly needed.

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    Barratt Developments

    UK's largest housebuilder announces new science-based carbon reduction targets

    The country's largest housebuilder, Barratt Developments, says it has become the first housebuilder to announce new science-based targets for reducing carbon emissions. It claims the targets are in line with efforts to limit global warming to 1.5oC, needed to mitigate the worst impacts of climate change.

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    Fabriq

    Air Quality Monitoring (AQM) and Analytics in Buildings

    The Fabriq OS platform automatically imports data from a wide range of air quality and environmental sensors, which can be flexibly installed in almost any environment directly by the occupant or the building manager.

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Thursday, 03 October 2019 16:11

Findings show human immune cells damaged by microplastics

Research presented at the Plastic Health Summit in Amsterdam will reveal immune cells that recognise and attack microplastics will die quickly as a result of the contact.

Experiments showed under laboratory conditions immune cells that encounter microplastics die around three times more quickly than those that don’t. Some forms of accelerated cell death or damage can prompt an inflammatory response in the body.

The study was led by Nienke Vrisekoop - Assistant Professor at the UMC Utrecht Center for Quantitative Immunology. Microplastics coated in blood plasma were placed in culture dishes alongside human immune cells under laboratory conditions. Some 20 percent of immune cells tested in culture dishes without microplastics died within 24 hours. When immune cells came into contact with microplastics 60 percent of the cells died within the same time period. This rate of cell death is thought to be far in excess of when immune cells encounter and engulf most bacteria or foreign bodies.

microplastic  immune cellsA growing body of evidence is pointing to the presence of microplastics in humans. Last year researchers at the Medical University of Vienna found 20 microplastic particles in every 10 grams of stool. The Plastic Health Summit in Amsterdam is set to see respected health experts from around the world debate the latest state-of-the-art research on micro- and nanoplastics, plastic additives, and health.

It's claimed that this summit the first time the world’s top scientists have got together to explore new and existing research on the impact of plastic and health.

At the summit today Liz Bonnin, the Irish science, wildlife and natural history presenter, will be receiving the results of a urine test revealing the levels of potentially harmful plastic-related chemicals in her body.

Organised by the Plastic Soup Foundation and supported by environmental campaign group A Plastic Planet, the summit will see vital new evidence presented exploring the link between plastic and ill-health. Assistant Professor Nienke Vrisekoop said: “These results raise serious questions about what microplastics are doing to our immune health. Urgent further research is needed to paint as full a picture as possible.”

A Plastic Planet co-founder Sian Sutherland said: “Anyone who cares about their health or the health of their children will be profoundly worried about today’s findings. With plastic production set to quadruple in the next decades, we need to ask ourselves – is this risk worth it for the sake of convenience in our throwaway lifestyle or is this finally the proof needed to turn off the plastic tap? The Plastic Health Summit is a vital catalyst for us to finally understand the true cost of plastic on human health.”

Maria Westerbos, founder and director of the Plastic Soup Foundation, said: “With this Summit, we want to prove once and for all that plastic doesn’t just harm nature and animals, but also ourselves. If we want to give our children and their children a fair chance, then all this proof is enough to turn the tide.”

David Azoulay, Environmental Health Program Director at the Center for International Environmental Law said: "The demonstrated impacts along the life cycle of plastic paint an unequivocally toxic picture: plastic threatens human health on a global scale. It's high time businesses across the world took responsibility for the plastic they produce."