Marketplace

  • Futurebuild 2020 Trade Shows & Conferences
    Futurebuild 2020

    The built environment industry can influence the resilience, sustainability and quality of homes, buildings and elements of infrastructure and cities. Registration has opened for Futurebuild 2020 with a call to industry to act now if we are to successfully tackle the challenges facing us all. By joining the event from 03 to 05 March at ExCeL London, visitors will be able to unite with industry innovators to tackle climate change and become the catalyst for change that's so greatly needed.

  • Barratt Developments Sustainable Building & Living
    Barratt Developments

    UK's largest housebuilder announces new science-based carbon reduction targets

    The country's largest housebuilder, Barratt Developments, says it has become the first housebuilder to announce new science-based targets for reducing carbon emissions. It claims the targets are in line with efforts to limit global warming to 1.5oC, needed to mitigate the worst impacts of climate change.

  • Fabriq Air Quality
    Fabriq

    Air Quality Monitoring (AQM) and Analytics in Buildings

    The Fabriq OS platform automatically imports data from a wide range of air quality and environmental sensors, which can be flexibly installed in almost any environment directly by the occupant or the building manager.

  • Tinytag Data Loggers Laboratory, Monitoring, Process & Analytical
    Tinytag Data Loggers

    Tinytag data loggers used to help sea turtle conservation efforts

    Tinytag Plus 2 temperature data loggers have been used to investigate methods of combating the effects of climate change on sea turtle populations in the Caribbean.

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Pollution

Research presented at the Plastic Health Summit in Amsterdam will reveal immune cells that recognise and attack microplastics will die quickly as a result of the contact.

A charity, Salmon & Trout Conservation (S&TC), who campaign to reverse the effects of industrialisation on the UK's rivers has commented on Ofwat imposing the biggest fine ever on a water company for "significant breaches of its licence conditions and its statutory duties." They write....

A community-focussed project aimed at encouraging parents and children to walk to school in Nottinghamshire has seen a commercial company of air quality experts join forces with a not-for-profit organisation.

Each time an item of clothing is washed up to 700,000 microscopic fibres make their way into our oceans, where they are swallowed by sea life and become incorporated into the food chain, potentially ending up on our plates, according to a new report by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers.

The average fine per prosecution brought by the Environment Agency against companies has increased six-fold in the last five years, according to research from global law firm Clyde & Co, but the amount of prosecutions has decreased in the same period.

Microplastics were present in all of 188 mussel samples in the River Ouse, a new study by a University of Brighton student has found.

Over two fifths, 43%, of children living in urban areas are concerned about the levels of air pollution near their school, new figures reveal. A YouGov poll, carried out for Sustrans, the walking and cycling charity, surveyed over 1,000 children aged six to 15 years old about their attitudes towards air pollution and the actions they think should be taken to help clean up the air.

Media giant Sky has placed £25 million into Sky Ocean Ventures, an investment vehicle that will fund new ideas and businesses who can help solve the oceans plastic crisis with solutions to everyday plastic problems, and it has also simultaneously launched an incubator project for businesses to test their ideas at Sky's west London campus.

Pioneering pollution-busting "moss trees" have been installed in Newcastle and London where they will purify the city centre air and create opportunities for research into the benefits of the plants' natural filtering abilities.

Residents affected by issues such as high levels of air pollution or noise nuisance often feel helpless and ignored, but now, using mobile phone apps and low cost open-source sensors, they are able to gather the facts they need to kick-start change.

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