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Hanovia

Environment Times is raising money for the homeless this winter by creating a 'virtual ecohouse'. Hanovia is one of the donors. Here they write about UV Water Treatment for Small Pools and Spas.

v ecohouse hanovia mainOwners and operators of small pools and spas don't need large UV systems to treat their water. What they do need, however, is high quality, reliable UV technology designed for smaller water flows. Until recently high quality UV options were limited – but help is at hand! Hanovia has just launched its new SwimLine Splash range, specifically designed for treating smaller water flows.

What are the benefits of UV for small pool and spa owners?
• To start with, Hanovia's medium pressure UV technology virtually eliminates the need for chlorination (except for small residual amounts) – so sore eyes and the unpleasant 'chlorine smell' are a thing of the past. In countless Hanovia installations around the world, bathers and staff always comment on how much better the air quality around the pool is
• Added to that, UV-treated water is demonstrably clearer and there is less wear and tear to building structures from unwanted chlorine by-products
• The SwimLine Splash is also economical to operate, very compact and easy to install, service and maintain – all important considerations for small operators
• If required, UV output can also be optimised with an optional UV intensity monitor

Commenting on Hanovia's UV technology, James Hadley, the company's Western Europe Sales Manager, says: "Bacteria like Cryptosporidium and Giardia are highly resistant to chlorine and can't be eliminated by using the chemical on its own – an additional step is therefore required to ensure their complete removal. UV is now one of the most popular methods of destroying them.

"In addition, chloramines – the unpleasant by-products of chlorination – can be effectively removed with UV. So, by being effective against chlorine resistant micro-organisms and by controlling chloramines, UV is a double-edged sword."

www.hanovia.com